Fun on the Farm

Farm kids have long learned to make their own fun, and Frances Marie Noehl of Deerfield, Chickasaw County, Iowa was no exception. Pictured here circa 1920, Frances is grinning as she sits on a wooden cart pulled by her dog, Shep. If his expression can be interpreted, he appears to have been game to take part in the shenanigans of Frances and her siblings: Leo, Helen, Kathryn, Elinor, John, Al, Frank, and Joe. Frances, born in the spring of 1911, fell between Frank and Joe in age as the second-to-youngest of the nine children of German immigrants Mathias and Elizabeth (Hoffman) Noehl.

Noehl_Frances_Shep_c1920_Iowa

Frances Marie Noehl with Shep, Chickasaw County, Iowa, circa 1920; digital image 2015, privately held by Valene Petersen, 2016.

Although the Noehls were not prosperous and bounced around from farm to farm while their children were young, the available recollections of their children indicate that plenty of fun was to be found in the country—after chores, of course. Following brief, unsuccessful stints in Canada and Minnesota around the turn of the century, the Noehls returned to Chickasaw County where they rented a farm near New Hampton.1 As a small child, Frances’s brother John, who was seven years her senior, could apparently often be found in the maple grove, contentedly sipping sweet sap from a tin cup under the watchful eye of another beloved dog, Sultan.2

Next, the family moved to an acreage in the town of North Washington, where the older children attended Catholic school and learned English for the first time.3 After three years there, the man who owned their property offered them a chance to rent out his farm in Deerfield, near the community of Alta Vista.4 John recalled his mother’s happiness as they prepared to resume farm life, teaching him to sing, “For to plow / For to mow / For to reap / For to sow / For to be a farmer’s boy.”5 It was now around 1910, and the family would remain on this farm for years to come. Aside from playtime with the family dog, rumor has it that Frances and her siblings also liked to have spitting contests while perched in the hayloft.6

With her bobbed haircut and loose-fitting, short-sleeved cotton dress, complete with a tie about the neck à la a sailor suit, Frances looks every bit an energetic 1920s tween.7 Her worn leather shoes appear to be barely staying on her feet and she sits relaxed with one bare (or stockinged) leg folded underneath. A massive barn with a stone foundation is visible behind her. This informal snapshot was likely taken by a family member, although since I have seen very few photographs of the Noehl family in general, I wonder if photography may have been only a passing hobby. In any case, it’s a pleasure to have a rare glimpse into a long-ago childhood.

Copyright © 2016 Melanie Frick. All Rights Reserved.


SOURCES
1 Noehl, Mathias. “Memoirs.” MS. New Hampton, Iowa, ca. 1938-1950. Privately held by Melanie Frick. Note: Excerpts from an unpaginated German to English translation.
2 Noehl, John Sylvester, “As I Remember,” Noehl Family Reunion Newsletter (1 Apr 1989).
3 Noehl, “As I Remember,” Noehl Family Reunion Newsletter.
4 Noehl, “As I Remember,” Noehl Family Reunion Newsletter.
5 Noehl, “As I Remember,” Noehl Family Reunion Newsletter.
6 Mary Kay (Walsted) Adam, conversation with the author, 2006; notes in author’s files.
7 “Vintage 1920s Children’s Fashion Clothes,” The People History (www.thepeoplehistory.com/1920skidsfashion.html : accessed 28 Mar 2016).

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One thought on “Fun on the Farm

  1. Kay Adam

    Awww…nice !!

    On Monday, March 28, 2016, Homestead Genealogical Research wrote:

    > Melanie Frick posted: “Farm kids have long learned to make their own fun, > and Frances Marie Noehl of Deerfield, Chickasaw County, Iowa was no > exception. Pictured here circa 1920, Frances is grinning as she sits on a > wooden cart pulled by her dog, Shep. If his expression can be ” >

    Reply

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